US National Arboretum


 

Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit

CULTIVARS AND NAMES OF LAGERSTROEMIA

CADDO - CS1

Lagerstroemia Checklist

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'Caddo' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Caddo' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image CADDO
(D.R. Egolf, HortSci. 25(5):585-587. 1990): Deciduous, low-spreading, semi-dwarf, multi-stemmed shrub, 2.5 m high and 2.5 m wide in 18 years; exfoliating bark on branches and trunk reveals light cinnamon brown (Greyed Orange 166C 3) bark coloration; lvs. faintly red-tinged when young, become semi-glossy, glabrous, dark green, elliptic to obovate, 3.3-5.5 cm long and 2.2-3.7 cm wide, bright orange red I autumn; ovate panicles 9-25 cm long, 7.5-17 cm wide, with 50 to 200 florets; fls. bright pink (Red Purple 63C), each floret 2.2-3 cm in diameter; blooms from mid-July to Sept.; highly tolerant to powdery mildew under field conditions. Orig. in 1973 from open pollinated seed of the cross {[F 1L. indica x L. (indica x fauriei) BASHAM’S PARTY PINK] x L. indica CHEROKEE}; selected in 1976; intro. in 1990 by the U.S. National Arboretum; NA 54962; PI 534642. Name registered May 1, 1992.

CAJUN RED
(Henry Field Seed & Nurs., Shenandoah , IA. Cat. 73:Sp 1984): Grows under 2 ft. Blooms June-Fall.
( Carolina Nurs., Moncks Corner, SC. Cat. Fl 1986): Watermelon Red. Plant Patent #5283. Listed as L. indica Dixie Series.
= ? CAJUN RED BEVERLY .

CAJUN RED BEVERLY
(Ornamentals South 4(3):13-14. April 1982): Miniature; watermelon rose flowers, begins blooming June 1-15; new, layering type.
(Hines Nurs., Inc., Santa Ana , CA . Cat. 42:1988): Watermelon Rose. PPA. Exclusive Hines Introduction. Miniature, weeping. L. indica Dixie Series.

CAMEO PINK
(Jack W. Foote, Durant Nursery Co., Durant , OK . Per. Com. 5/15/74): “We haven’t introduced any new varieties other than this one but have named 3 varieties obtained from Texas Nursery Company, now called the Fitzpatrick Nursery of Sherman, TX, they are CAMEO PINK Crapemyrtle, PURE WHITE Crapemyrtle and COLBERT RED crapemyrtle. We also named a purple crapemyrtle obtained from Warren Nursery in Oklahoma City, OK, CITY PURPLE Crapemyrtle.”

CANDIDA
(S. Percy-Lancaster, Proc. & Jour. Agr. Hort. Soc. India. p. 20. 1920): Fls. pure white, large infl.

CANDYCANE
(Greenleaf Nurs., Park Hill , OK . Cat. 22:1990-1991): red trimmed in white.
(Mark Andrews, Greenleaf Nursery Co., Park Hill, OK. Letter. 2/5/93): “With Lagerstroemia indicaCANDYCANE we named this variety after evaluating it as a numbered selection from 5-M Nursery in Lindale, TX. This nursery no longer exists, so we have no chance to reconstruct the exact background on this variety.”
(James C. Kell, Comp.., Houston, TX. Crapemyrtles in Cultivation, 1990: Rev. 6/94. unpubl.): pink (medium) picotee with white edge, dark pink veining in white area, more or less pyramidal panicles; 12-14' height, multi-trunked; hardiness USDA zone 6 or 7.

CANDYSTRIPE
(James C. Kell, Comp.., Houston , TX . Crapemyrtles in Cultivation, 1990: Rev. 6/94. unpubl.): multi-trunked, bushy and upright, semi-pendulous when in bloom, 8-14 ft. height; small trunks; new growth red; hardiness USDA zone 7; pink picotee (rose pink with white edge), more or less pyramidal panicles; profuse bloom.

CARMINATA
(Angel Peluffo, Buenos Aires , Argentina . Cat. p. 182. 1902?, without descr.).

CARMINE
(Knull Floral Co., Tampa, FL. Cat. p. 18. 1921): Fls. very bright.
(Royal Palm Nurs., Oneco, FL. Cat. p. 29. 1923): Fls. bright colored; sometimes cataloged as crimson; orig. as seedling at Royal Palm Nurs., from seed imported in 1886.
= CRIMSON, CARMINE PINK.

CARMINE PINK
(Ashford Park Nurs., Atlanta, GA. Cat. p. 15. 1923): Fls. inclined to be scarlet.
= CRIMSON, CARMINE.

CARNEA
(Prince Nurs., Flushing , NY . Cat. p. 139. 1827, without descr.)
(Wh. F. Sahut, L’Illus. Hort. 20:99. 1873): Fls. delicate rose or flesh color--becoming almost white.

CAROLINA BEAUTY
(Fruitland Nurs., Augusta, GA. Cat. p. 12-13. 1954-1955): Fls. dark red. Selected by Daileys Nurs. , SC , c. 1940. Tyrian Purple (727 1).

'CASCADING PINK LADY'
(U.S. Plant Patent #19277): Deciduous compact shrub to 16 to 20 in tall and 36 to 40 in wide; leaves 27 to 32 mm long and 16 to 21 mm wide, young leaves emerge Green 137B on upper surface and Green 137D on the lower surface, mature to Green 137A on upper and Green 137 D on lower surface; inflorescences 6 to 10 cm long and 4 to 8 cm wide with up to 21 flowers,  flowers emerge Red-Purple 72D, transition to Red-Purple 70C, then Red-Purple 70D, before dehiscing, occasionally flowers open Red-Purple 70D.  Originated as a whole plant sport of `ROSEY CARPET` (U.S. Plant Pat. No. 13,965). Named and introduced by Robert E. Hambuchen and Betty Hambuchen.  Name registered January 29, 2014.

'Catawba' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Catawba' flowers. Click thumbnail for larger image CATAWBA
(D. Egolf, Baileya 15(1):7-8. 1967): Dense, globose shrub, 3.5 m high; lvs. glossy dark green, thinly coriaceous, turning brilliant orange-red in autumn; panicles 12-17 cm long, 11-15 cm wide, abundantly produced, fls. dark purple (Violet Purple 733/1 1); highly mildew tolerant; orig. in 1960 from cross of L. indicaDWARF PURPLE x L. indica LIGHT LAVENDER and intro. in 1967 by U.S. National Arboretum; NA 28861; PI 316671. Name registered September 20, 1966.

CEDAR RED
(Cedar Lane Farm, Inc., Semmes , AL . Cat. p. 11. Fall/Winter 1989-90): Selected by us from a large number of seedlings, this cultivar has blooms of an intense yellow-red, as opposed to most crepemyrtles with a bluish-red cast. We consider this relatively slow-growing plant an important addition to the landscape palette and have registered it at the National Arboretum.
(Woody Plant Registration Form, U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC. 3/12/93 ): A selection made from seedlings given to Cedar Lane Farm by Bruce Hancock, originally obtained from Otto Spring. Sel. and named in 1983. A semi-dwarf attaining a height of 3-4' in 5 years. Most outstanding is its bloom which is a true red, with no blue in it (ISCC-NBS #11 very red). New foliage is red (ISCC-NBS #13 deep red to #17 very deep red) which turns green. Hardy to at least USDA zone 7; survived 4F with -10F wind chill in a container. Name registered April 5, 1993.

CENTENNIAL
(A.E. Einert and V.M. Watts, Ark. Farm Research XX11(3):3. 1973): Compact, globular shrub, average height of 6.6 dm each season following dormant pruning; lvs. slightly glossy, elliptic, above (Green 138A 2), beneath (Yellow Green 146B), 3.0-3.9 cm long, 1.9-2.4 cm wide, yellow to red autumn coloration; panicles 10 cm long, 11 cm wide; fls. mid-June, average 4.5 per infl., 3.4 cm diam., dark purple (Purple Violet 81A), claw reddish purple (Red Purple 63A), old flowers grayish; high powdery mildew resistance; hardy USDA zone 7, may be killed to ground in zone 6. Orig. in 1962 by Victor M. Watts, Fayetteville , AR ; intro. in 1973 by A.E. Einert, Fayetteville , AR. Name registered May 17, 1973.

CENTENNIAL SPIRIT
(Carl E. Whitcomb, HortSci. 20(6):1144-1145. 1985): Vigorous upright shrub or small tree with few secondary branches or suckers; lvs. smaller and thicker than the species average, dark green turning red-orange in fall; infl. large, strongly upright, 20-30 cm in length, 0-20 cm wide; individual petals are dark wine-red (spiraea red; Royal Horticulture Society Colour Chart #025) and discolor very little with age; flowers late June-Oct.; has shown consistent resistance to powdery mildew under landscape and container conditions. Orig. in 1981 as open-pollinated seedling of an F 1 generation of L. indica treated with the mutagen EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate); intro. 1985. Plant Patent #6383.

'Cherokee' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Cherokee' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image CHEROKEE
(D. Egolf, Baileya 17(1):1-2. 1970): Open-branched shrub, 2.5 m high; lvs. glossy dark green, thinly coriaceous; panicles 14-19 cm long, 9-15 cm wide, fls brilliant red (Red Purple 63A 2); orig. in 1960 from cross of L. indica HARDY RED x L. indica LOW FLAME; intro. in 1970 by U.S. National Arboretum; NA 30167; PI 326427. Name registered March 17, 1970.

CHEYENNE
(American Nurseryman 198(12):34. 2003): Deciduous multi-stemmed shrub with compact, rounded habit, 3.0 meters high and 3.0 meters wide in 15 years; exfoliating bark on branches and trunk reveals medium brown (RHS 177D) bark coloration; mature leaves glossy dark green (RHS 147A), rounded, 4-5 cm long and 3 cm wide and slightly acute at the apex; flower panicles 15 cm long and 10 cm wide, dense, with dark magenta to red flowers (RHS 60B); highly tolerant to powdery mildew. Originated in 1990 from pedigree [(L. 'Tuscarora' x (L. indica Red x L. indica 'Carolina Beauty')) x (L. limii x L. indica Asuka dwarf hybrid )] x [(L. 'Tuscarora' x (L. indica Red x L. indica 'Carolina Beauty')) x (L. limii x L. indica Asuka dwarf hybrid)]. Selected in 1996; named and introduced in 2003 by the U.S. National Arboretum. NA68973; PI633035. Name registered August 30, 2005.

CHICA™ PINK
(Monrovia Nurs. Co. , Azusa , CA . Wholesale Cat. 77:1993): Very dwarf, upright grower 3-3½’ high and wide, branches tipped by bright pink clusters throughout summer months.
= MONINK.

CHICA™ RED
(Monrovia Nurs. Co. , Azusa , CA . Wholesale Cat. 77:1993): Very dwarf grower 3-4' high and wide, upright dense branches topped by rose-red flowers throughout summer.
= MONED.

'Chickasaw' growth habit. Click thumbnail for larger image 'Chickasaw' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image CHICKASAW
(M.R. Pooler and R.L. Dix, HortSci. 34(2):361-363. 1999): The first true miniature L. indica x L. fauriei hybrid, reaching a height of 0.6 m and a width of 0.7 m after 7 years in container culture. Lvs. are 1.1-2.8 cm long and 0.6-1.7 cm wide. Fine textured dark green (Green 139A 3) foliage turns bronze-red (Greyed Red 180A) in the fall. Infls. are small, compact dense panicles, 2.5-3.0 cm long and 2.5-3.5 cm wide, containing 25-50 buds and fls. Fls. are pink-lavender (Red-Purple 70B), appear in mid- to late summer, approx. 2 weeks after fls. appear on standard forms of crapemyrtle, and persist until frost. Retains its compact, mound-shaped habit without pruning and is highly resistant to powdery mildew. Crosses leading to CHICKASAW were made in 1967, 1972, 1979, 1986, and 1989; the crosses involved five original plants, L. fauriei, L. indica DWARF RED, L. indica LOW FLAME, and 2 dwarf L. indica. Sel. in 1990 and intro. in 1997 by the U.S. National Arboretum; NA 62919; PI 596408. Name registered April 10, 1997.

CHISAM FIRE
(David Byers, Crapemyrtle A Grower’s Thoughts. p. 59. 1997): This new selection has bright red flowers, upright habit and is an especially heavy bloomer. Sometimes grows to four and one-half feet. Developed by David Chopin, now of Washington, PA.

CHOCOLATE MOCHA
(U.S. Plant Patent #21540): Deciduous, upright, multiple- or single-trunk large shrub to 6 to 7 ft tall and 3 to 3.5 ft wide after 3 years; leaves elliptic, 1.75 to 2.5 in long and 1 to 1.25 in wide, young leaves dark yellowish green (Green 137A)(RHS, 2001) later brownish gray (Brown 200A); inflorescences 6 in long and 4.5 in wide with deep purplish pink (Red-Purple 68A) flowers, some mildew tolerance; originated from the cross of ‘WHIT IV’ × ‘SARAH’S FAVORITE’; selected in 2003 by Patricia Knight and Wayne McLaurin and intro. by Mississippi State University; Name registered May 10, 2013.

'Choctaw' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Choctaw' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image CHOCTAW
(D.R. Egolf, HortSci. 25(8):992-993. 1990): Deciduous, multi-stemmed, small tree, 5.7 m high and 6.1 m wide at 19 years; sinuous, mottled, older branches and trunk exfoliate annually to a light cinnamon brown (Greyed-Orange 166D to darker Greyed-Orange 166B 3); lvs. dark green, glossy, subcoriaceous, elliptic, 5.0-8.5 cm long and 2.7-3.5 cm wide, bronze to maroon autumn coloration; long-tapered, multi-branched pyramidal panicles, 18-44 cm long, 12-35 cm wide with 100 to 500 florets; fls. clear, bright pink (Red 55B); continuous recurrent bloom from early July to Sept.; field resistant to powdery mildew. Orig. in 1970 from a cross of [(L. indica PINK LACE x l. fauriei) X L. indica POTOMAC]; selected in 1973; intro. in 1990 by the U.S. National Arboretum; NA 60884; PI 534643. Name registered May 1, 1992.

CHRISTIANA
(Carroll Gard., Westminster , MD. 86:1988): Deep rich red flower trusses. Grows 5-8' tall.
(James C. Kell, Comp., Houston , TX . Crape Myrtles in Cultivation. 1990: Rev. 6/94. unpubl.): Red (dark, almost burgundy), darkest red of all Crapemyrtles to date; more or less pyramidal panicles. Orig. by Five-M Nursery.

CHRISTMAS TIME
(Buds & Blooms, Brown Summit , NC . July 15, 1987): Pure white, medium height.
(James C. Kell, Comp., Houston , TX . Crapemyrtles in Cultivation. 1990: Rev. 6/94. unpubl.): Multi-trunked, upright, height 12'; light green lvs. with thin yellow edge, new growth not reddish; no red on new stems; white, extra large more or less pyramidal panicles.
= CHRISTMASTIME.

CITY PURPLE
(Jack W. Foote, Durant Nursery Co., Durant , OK . Pers. Com. 5/15/74): “We also named a purple crapemyrtle obtained from Warren Nursery in Okla. City, OK, CITY PURPLE Crapemyrtle.”

CLOUD WHITE
(Hines Nurs., Houston, TX. Hines Houston Plants & Prices, 31:Jan. 1993): Light, clear white clusters. Listed under Standards: (18-25').
= WHITE CLOUD.

COCCINEA
(Fratelli Sgaravatti Pianti, Saonara, Padova , Italy . Cat. #308 p. 34. 1954-55): Fls. brilliant red, panicles large.

COERULEA NANA
(Cornelius Nurs., Houston , TX . 7:1955-56): Dwarf blue.
= DWARF BLUE.

COLBERT RED
(Jack W. Foote, Durant Nursery Company, Durant , OK . Pers. Com. 5/15/74): “We haven’t introduced any new varieties...but have named 3 varieties obtained from Texas Nursery Company, now called the Fitzpatrick Nursery of Sherman, TX; they are CAMEO PINK Crapemyrtle, PURE WHITE Crapemyrtle and COLBERT RED Crapemyrtle.”

COLE’S HARDY PINK
(Cole Nurs., Painesville , OH . Cat. p. 24. 1958): Fls. pink, prolific bloomer from early August to frost.
= HARDY PINK, COLE’S TRUE HARDY.

COLE’S TRUE HARDY
(Cole Nurs., Painesville , OH . Cat. p. 7. 1951): Fls. soft pink; hardy to N. Massachusetts.
= HARDY PINK, COLE’S HARDY PINK.

'Comanche' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Comanche' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image COMANCHE
(D.R. Egolf, HortSci. 22(4):674-677. 1987): Deciduous, upright, multiple-stemmed, large shrub or small tree with broad spreading crown, 3.5 m high and 3.8 m wide at 15 years; sinuous, mottled, light sandalwood (Greyed Orange 164D to 165C 2) bark coloration on exfoliating older branches and trunk; lvs. light bronze at first, maturing to dark green, elliptic to obovate, glossy, glabrous, turning dark orange red to dark purple red in autumn; globose, branched panicles 16-24 cm long, 12-24 cm wide, with 85 to 200 dark coral pink (Red 54A) florets, each 3.5-4.5 cm in diameter; blooms from late July to mid-Sept. Orig. from hybridization in 1969 of L. indica DARK RED X (L. indica x L. fauriei sdlg.); selected in 1973; intro. in 1987 by the U.S. National Arboretum; NA 54976; PI 499822. Name registered May 1, 1992.

'Conestoga' bark.  Click thumbnail for larger image 'Conestoga' flowers.  Click thumbnail for larger image CONESTOGA
(D. Egolf, Baileya 15(1):8,10. 1967): Open-branched deciduous shrub, 3 m high and 4 m wide; lvs. thinly coriaceous, panicles 17-20 m long, 10-16 cm wide, long tapered, gracefully arching, fls. open lavender (Phlox Purple 632/2, 632/3 and lighter 1) and change to pale lavender to produce a multiple-colored infl.; orig. in 1960 from cross of L. indicaALBA X L. indica LOW FLAME, and intro. in 1967 by U.S. National arboretum; NA 28862; PI 316672. Name registered September 20, 1966.

CORAL FILLI
(U.S. Plant Patent #14317): Deciduous compact shrub to 1.5 ft tall and 1.5 ft wide after 3 years; leaves 1.5 in long and 0.75 in wide, young leaves emerge slightly darker than 5-L, page 69, PLATE 23 [Dictionary of Color (Mearz and Paul)] on upper and lower surface of leaf, mature to 5-B, page 67, PLATE 22 on upper and lower surface; flowers 1.75 in wide, emerge and mature between 1-E, page 107, PLATE 42 and 2-J, page 107, PLATE 42. Originated from a cross between two unnamed/unpatented Fleming L. indica plants. ‘CORAL FILLI’ first bloomed in the summer of 1978 and was selected by David Fleming and Gretchen Zwetzig in Lincoln, NE. Named and introduced by David W. Fleming and Grechen A. Zwetzig.  Name registered January 29, 2014.

CORAL FILLI
(U.S. Plant Patent #14353): Deciduous compact shrub to 1.5 ft tall and 1.5 ft wide after 3 years; leaves 1.5 in long and 0.75 in wide, young leaves emerge slightly darker than 5-L, page 69, PLATE 23 [Dictionary of Color (Mearz and Paul)] on upper and lower surface of leaf, mature to 5-B, page 67, PLATE 22 on upper and lower surface; flowers 1.75 in wide, emerge and mature slightly lighter than 1-L, page 113, PLATE 45. Originated from a cross between two unnamed/unpatented Fleming L. indica plants. ‘RED FILLI’ first bloomed in the summer of 1978 and was selected by David Fleming and Gretchen Zwetzig in Lincoln, NE. Named and introduced by David W. Fleming and Grechen A. Zwetzig.  Name registered January 29, 2014.

CORAL MAGIC
(U.S. Plant Patent #23922): Deciduous, compact shrub to 91 cm tall and 82 cm wide after 4 years; leaves 43 mm long and 21 mm wide, young leaves emerge Greyed-Purple 183A on upper and lower surfaces, mature to Yellow-Green 147A on upper surface and Yellow-Green 146B on lower surface; inflorescences 10 cm long and 7 cm wide, flowers 20 mm long and 35 mm wide, emerge and mature Purple 61D; Originated from  open-pollinated seed of an ‘GAMAD VI’. (Griffith Propagation Nursery Inc. Catalog, 2014): “(6 Ft.)(Zone 6) Intense salmon-pink flowers in mid-June. Reddish new growth, becoming dark green in summer.” Named and introduced by Joshua Kardos.  Name registered January 28, 2014.

CORAL PINK
(Emlong Nurs., Stevensville, MI. Cat. p. 23. Sp 1955, without descr.).

CORDON BLEU
(Ornamentals South 4(3):13-14. April 1982): Miniature crapemyrtle with lavender fls.; begins blooming May 15-June 1; heavy bloomer.
(Henry Field Seed & Nurs. Co. , Shenandoah , IA. 73:SP 1984): Grows 18-24 ins. Blooms May to Oct.
(Carolina Nurs., Moncks Corner, SC. Cat. FL 1986): Lavender. Plant Patent #4256. ( Dixie Series).
(David Chopin, Washington , PA. Variety Listing and Descriptions, undated, included with pers. com. to David Byers. 5/11/95): Color: Lavender Blue. Height: 2-3'. Very heavy bloomer.
[NOTE: This plant was originally registered December 15, 1980 , and published in The Lagerstroemia Handbook/Checklist, AABGA, p. 42-43. 1978, as LOUISA. A request by the originator to change the name to CORDON BLEU was made in a letter dated December 10, 1981. At that time the request was denied. In accordance with Article 14.3, International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants-1995, p. 17, 1995, the name CORDON BLEU is now the accepted epithet.]
= CORDON BLUE, IMPROVED CORDON BLEAU, LOUISA.

CORDON BLUE
(Clyde Holloway’s Nurs., Forest Hilll , LA. 3:Fall 1995-Spring 1996 W.P.L.): Dwf. Lav.
= CORDON BLEU, IMPROVED CORDON BLEAU, LOUISA.

COSTATA
(Briggs Nurs., Olympia , WA . Cat. 1959-1960): Fls. red. No longer in cultivation.

COTTON BALL
(C.W. Stuart & Co. , Newark , NY . Cat. p. 31. 1950): 8-15 ft high; fls. lacy white; zone 6, 7, 8.

COUNTRY RED
(Durant Nurs., Durant, OK. Cat. 1956-57): Upright; fls. 3 weeks later than most cultivars, blood red; mildew resistant; one of the hardiest. Orig. in 1952 and intro. in 1956 by Durant Nurs. Red Purple 63A 2.
= DURANT RED, PURE RED.

COURTHOUSE
(Eastern Shore Nurs., Easton , MD. Cat. p. 26. 1956-57): Fls. bright red.

CRAPE MYRTLETTES
(Southern Florist & Nurseryman, Feb. 4, 1972, advert. p. 55, Geo. W. Park Seed Co., Inc., Greenwood, SC): New! Crapemyrtle for Pots. From Seed to Bloom in 4 mo. A New Dwarf Hybrid. Crapemyrtlettes. From Japan come these new, dwarf crape Myrtles--so dwarf you can enjoy them planted in the garden or in containers. Great flower heads in lovely unusual colors ranging from dark red, rose-red, pink, rose-pink, white, lilac-lavender to lavender. They are easily grown from seed, and bloom the first season. Plants at blooming time are 12 to 18 inches tall and bushy. They are self-branching. In the north they will freeze back to the ground;, protect roots with heavy mulch.
(George W. Park Seed Co., Inc., Greenwood, SC. Flower Book. 7:1974): Plants begin blooming toward the end of July when only 12 inches high if started in March. After becoming established they form a neat hedge 12 to 14 inches high and bloom right up until frost. Slow, steady growth for 4 or 5 years will see a height of only 3 or 4 feet. Lagerstroemia indica. Hardy to zone 8.

CREOLE
(Carolina Nurs., Moncks Corner, SC. Cat. FL 1986): Watermelon red (PAF).
(David Byers, Crapemyrtle A Grower’s Thoughts, p. 59. 1997): Layered habit and watermelon flowers; will usually reach three feet.
(David Chopin, Washington , PA. Variety Listing and Descriptions, undated, included with pers. com. to David Byers, Huntsville, Alabama. 5/11/95): Color: Watermelon Red. Height: 2-3'. Larger variety and unusually attractive in that each branch grows one over the other forming “layers” of branches.

CRIMSON
(Nanz & Neuner, Louisville, KY. Cat. p. 39. 1888): Fls. bright deep crimson.
(Inter-State Nurs., Macclenny , FL. Cat. p. 18. 1919): Upright, strong grower; larger flower clusters.
= CARMINE, CARMINE PINK.

CRIMSON BEAUTY
(Spring Hill Nurs., Tipp City , OH . Cat. p. 33. 1946, without descr.).

CS1
(U.S. Plant Patent #20926): Deciduous compact shrub to 1 m tall and 52 cm wide; leaves 55 mm long and 39 mm wide, young leaves emerge and mature Green N137A on upper surface and Green 137B on lower surface; inflorescences 17.5 cm long and 9 cm wide, flowers 17 mm long and 32 mm wide, emerge and mature Red-Purple 70A. Originated from an open pollinated seedling of ‘ZUNI’. (Greenleaf Nursery Co. Catalog, 2013-2014): “This tall, strongly upright Crapemyrtle reaches 10 to 12 feet tall. Burgundy flowers are showcased against the glossy, dark green foliage. It features heavy resistance to powdery mildew.” Named and introduced by James Spivey and Albert F. Stauder III.  Name registered January 29, 2014.
= BRADBERRY WINE™


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Lagerstroemia Checklist

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CULTIVARS AND NAMES OF LAGERSTROEMIA
COMPILED BY RUTH L. DIX -- December 1, 1999 -- U.S. National Arboretum
Posted to U.S. National Arboretum Website January 6, 2005
-- Revised May 25, 2005
-- Revised August 30, 2005

-- Revised June 26, 2013

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