US National Arboretum

 
 

Arboretum Plant Photo Gallery
Answer to the Front Page Picture of the Week Question
for Dec 2nd - Dec 12th, 2005

Picture of Camellia Winter's Beauty.  Click here for a larger image.
This is Camellia 'Winter's Beauty', or 'Winter's Beauty' camellia.

After the harsh winters in the late 1970s and early 1980s that killed hundreds of the National Arboretumís camellia holdings, National Arboretum plant breeder, Dr. William Ackerman, set out to breed new cold-hardy camellias from those specimens that survived. As a result, the Arboretum introduced many attractive and hardy camellias from Dr. Ackermanís diligent breeding. Camellia 'Winter's Beauty' was introduced into the nursery trade in 1995 by Dr. Ackerman after he retired.

'Winter's Beauty' camellia has been reported to withstand temperatures down to -10įF and, hardy in
USDA Hardiness Zone 6 to 9. The regular bloom period can start in October, and if temperatures remain mild, it may continue blooming into January in the Washington, D.C. area. 'Winter's Beauty' is evergreen and thrives in understory shade. You can view this plant in the Asian Collections.

[Click on the picture to see a larger image].
Be sure to go to the Picture of the Week Archive
or see the links below to view other plant images in our various Photo Galleries.

Go to:
Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) Photo Gallery
Award Winning Daylilies Photo Gallery
U.S. National Arboretum Crapemyrtle Introductions Photo Gallery
Glenn Dale Azaleas Photo Gallery
Fall Foliage Photo Gallery
Photo Gallery Introduction

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Last Updated   December 2, 2005 10:10 AM
URL = http://www.usna.usda.gov/PhotoGallery/AnswerGallery/ImageAnswer_120205.html

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